Management of constipation
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Management of constipation

Lynne Marsh Branch leader, University College Cork, Republic of Ireland
Maria Caples Lecturer, Catherine McAuley School of Nursing and Midwifery, University College Cork, Republic of Ireland
Caroline Dalton Lecturer, Catherine McAuley School of Nursing and Midwifery, University College Cork, Republic of Ireland
Elaine Drummond Lecturer, Catherine McAuley School of Nursing and Midwifery, University College Cork, Republic of Ireland

Using a case study, Lynne Marsh and colleagues describe how non-pharmacological treatment of constipation can lead to improved independence, self-esteem and quality of life

Constipation is more common among people with intellectual disability compared with the general population. Causation falls into the three main categories related to lifestyle changes, physiological conditions and medication. If recognised early, constipation is easily managed, usually without having to resort to laxatives.

Learning Disability Practice. 13, 4, 26-28. doi: 10.7748/ldp2010.05.13.4.26.c7760

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