Communication supports in residential services
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Communication supports in residential services

Caroline Dalton Lecturer, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University College Cork, Ireland
John Sweeney Lecturer, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University College Cork, Ireland

Research shows a mismatch between what staff perceive to be important when helping people express themselves and how they help them in reality, say Caroline Dalton and John Sweeney

The ability to communicate personal needs, choices, hopes and aspirations is vital in determining how individuals live their lives and make decisions about their future, which in turn is a hallmark of person-centred care. Some people with an intellectual disability, living in residential services, need support to communicate effectively. Research indicates that not all of these people receive such supports; staff may not have the necessary skills, environment or resources to establish satisfactory two-way communication, in spite of being aware of its importance. It is crucial that front line staff in residential services advocate on behalf of those who require communication supports and ensure this issue is close to the top of the service delivery agenda.

Learning Disability Practice. 13, 9,14-19. doi: 10.7748/ldp2010.11.13.9.14.c8094

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