beyond zero tolerance in caring for people with learning disability
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beyond zero tolerance in caring for people with learning disability

Gary Watt Staff nurse, Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust

By the very nature of their role, many carers will always have to cope with violent incidents at work. So how can a zero tolerance stance be reasonably adopted in a learning disability setting? Gary Watt considers the legal, social and ethical implications of following such a policy

Since its inauguration in 1999, the concept of zero tolerance (Department of Health (DH) 1999) has become well-established in care settings. Current policy statements identify violence and aggression at work as intolerable and a violation of human and occupational rights.

Learning Disability Practice. 10, 8,34-37. doi: 10.7748/ldp2007.10.10.8.34.c4282

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