Audiology services: access, assessment and aftercare
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Audiology services: access, assessment and aftercare

Lynzee McShea Senior clinical scientist (audiology) in the audiology department, Sunderland Royal Hospital
Chris Corkish Senior lecturer and practitioner in learning disability nursing, Faculty of health and life sciences, University of Northumbria
Su McAnelly Director of programmes, Faculty of health and life sciences, University of Northumbria

Lynzee McShea and colleagues describe the best way to ensure a good quality of life in adults with learning disabilities and hearing loss

The prevalence of hearing loss among people with learning disabilities is considerably higher than in the general population, yet few clients access audiology services. This article refers to a case study to illustrate how the needs of people with learning disabilities who may have hearing loss can be met.

It proposes a number of cost-effective solutions that emphasise flexible, individualised approaches to care. These solutions are organised into three themes, access, assessment and aftercare, which the authors call the 3As. Together, they offer a continuum of care for individuals that should be championed by appropriate practitioners in multidisciplinary teams. The 3As model is also relevant to other aspects of health care and improvement.

Learning Disability Practice. 17, 2,20-25. doi: 10.7748/ldp2014.02.17.2.20.e1531

Correspondence

su.mcanelly@northumbria.ac.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 06 January 2014

Accepted: 30 January 2014