Assessing distress in people with intellectual disabilities
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Assessing distress in people with intellectual disabilities

Keith Marshall Cognitive behaviour therapist, Clinical psychology adult learning disability service, NHS Lothian, Edinburgh
Fleur-Michelle Coiffait Trainee clinical psychologist, Clinical psychology adult learning disability service, NHS Lothian, Edinburgh
Simon Willoughby-Booth Lead art therapist, Clinical psychology adult learning disability service, NHS Lothian, Edinburgh

Keith Marshall and colleagues discuss a modified version of Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation, a tool that helps clients self-report their experiences of stress

Background There are few available tools for screening and assessing mental distress in people with intellectual disabilities.

Method Comparison of the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation: Learning Disabilities (CORE-LD) tool with other psychometrically robust but more specific measures.

Results Scores derived from CORE-LD correlate with those of established measures that have been adapted for use with people with learning disabilities.

Conclusions As a tool for measuring mental health problems and levels of distress, CORE-LD is as valid as established tools for measuring anxiety, depression and self-esteem.

Learning Disability Practice. 16, 3,26-30. doi: 10.7748/ldp2013.04.16.3.26.e1426

Correspondence

keith.marshall2@nhs.net

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 31 December 2012

Accepted: 08 February 2013