A protocol for the preparation of patients for theatre and recovery
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A protocol for the preparation of patients for theatre and recovery

Jim Blair Consultant nurse learning disability, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, London, Kingston University and St George’s University of London, England
Tracey Anthony Lead nurse theatres, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, London, England
Isadora Gunther Healthcare assistant, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, London, England
Yvonne Hambley Sister, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, London, England
Naomi Harrison Operating department practitioner, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, London, England
Nada Lambert Operating department practitioner, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, London, England
Catherine Stuart Sister and ward manager, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, London, England

This article explores the creation of a specific protocol to prepare children and young people with learning disabilities effectively for theatre and to ensure appropriate support during recovery. The TEACH approach (time, environment, attitude, communication and help) was adopted to provide a framework for reasonably adjusted care. The theatre and recovery protocol was developed following complaints by parents of children with learning disabilities about unsatisfactory care, and after cancelled operations. The young person is offered a pre-admission visit and a hospital passport, which explores their likes and dislikes and enables staff to prepare for their specific needs and requirements. In recovery, a quieter and larger area has been created. The protocol has enabled staff to feel more confident and to individually address the young person’s needs. This protocol could easily be adopted for many other people regardless of age or disability who need to have care altered to meet their needs.

Correspondence Jim.Blair@gosh.nhs.uk

Learning Disability Practice. 20, 2,22-26. doi: 10.7748/ldp.2017.e1772

Received: 13 June 2016

Accepted: 19 August 2016

Published in print: 27 March 2017

Peer review

This article has been subject to double-blind review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Conflict Of Interest

None declared