Nurse practitioner autonomy in a clinical setting
A&S Science Previous     Next

Nurse practitioner autonomy in a clinical setting

Frank L Cole Associate Professor of Nursing, Division Head of Emergency Care, and Director of Emergency Nurse Practitioner Education, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas
Elda Ramirez Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas

A descriptive study of three US emergency nurse practitioners: characteristics of patients seen, tests ordered, and procedures performed

Nurse practitioners (NPs) in the United States have been providing care in hospital emergency departments (EDs) for more than 15 years. Educating NPs, specifically for practice in the ED, was proposed and implemented in the mid Seventies. This specificity departed from primary care programmes by emphasising the assessment and management of critically ill or injured persons (Fincke 1975, Hardy 1978, Hayden et al 1982). Although five programmes existed in this time frame, all were subsequently phased out; their focus varied from providing care to non-acute to critically ill patients in the ED, and ranged from hospital-based certificate programmes to one associated with a graduate nursing programme (Fincke 1975, Geolot et al 1977, Hardy 1978, Hayden et al 1982).

Emergency Nurse. 7, 9, 26-30. doi: 10.7748/en2000.02.7.9.26.c1310

Want to read more?

Subscribe for unlimited access

Try 1 month’s access for just £1 and get:

Your subscription package includes:
  • Full access to the website and the online archive
  • Bi-monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal
Subscribe
Already subscribed? Log in

Alternatively, you can purchase access to this article for the next seven days. Buy now

Or