Investigating the link between organisational justice, positive organisational behaviour and productivity in emergency nurses
Intended for healthcare professionals
Evidence and practice    

Investigating the link between organisational justice, positive organisational behaviour and productivity in emergency nurses

Mohammad Ali Heydari Gorji Associate professor and PhD student in nursing and management, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran
Azar Khodabakshi Sahebi MSc student, Nursing School, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran
Tahereh Yaghoubi Assistant professor, Traditional and Complementary Medicine Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran
Jamshid Yazdani Cherati Professor of biostatistics, Faculty of Health, Health Sciences Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran
Salma Ahmed Professor, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India
Leila Zhianfar Assistant professor, Community Health Department, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran

Why you should read this article:
  • To familiarise yourself with factors that can affect employees’ attitudes towards their role

  • To recognise the link between improved productivity in healthcare services and ensuring patients’ health and well-being

  • To learn how organisational justice can be linked to improved productivity in emergency nurses

Background Human resource management and employees’ performance are fundamental to the success of healthcare organisations. Therefore, it is important to consider the factors that may affect employees’ performance.

Aim To determine the relationship between perceived organisational justice, positive organisational behaviour (POB) and the productivity of emergency nurses.

Method This was a descriptive-analytical study that involved distributing questionnaires to emergency nurses working in hospitals affiliated with Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in Iran. The researchers used proportionate stratified sampling to calculate the sample size. Three questionnaires were used to collect data on organisational justice, POB and productivity. The data were analysed using the Pearson correlation coefficient and multiple regression tests.

Results The questionnaires were distributed to 284 emergency nurses and completed by 234 of them. The results demonstrated a significant relationship between the productivity of the emergency nurses and the variables of perceived organisational justice and POB.

Conclusion Higher levels of perceived organisational justice and POB in the ED setting are likely to lead to increased productivity among emergency nurses, and as a result the quality of patient care is likely to improve. Therefore, healthcare organisations should pay particular attention to the application of organisational justice, with the aim of promoting POB among nurses and increasing their productivity.

Emergency Nurse. doi: 10.7748/en.2022.e2134

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

heydarigorji@gmail.com

Conflict of interest

None declared

Heydari Gorji MA, Sahebi AK, Yaghoubi T et al (2022) Investigating the link between organisational justice, positive organisational behaviour and productivity in emergency nurses. Emergency Nurse. doi: 10.7748/en.2022.e2134

Acknowledgements

Research for this article was funded by Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. The authors would like to thank all the staff members of the hospitals where the study was conducted and the nurses who responded to the questionnaires, as well as all the teaching staff who have assisted with this research and supportive funding agencies

Published online: 11 October 2022

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