Emergency department use by people on low income
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Emergency department use by people on low income

Ruth Wetta-Hall Assistant professor, Department of preventive medicine and public health, University of Kansas school of medicine, Wichita
Elizabeth Ablah Teaching associate, Department of preventive medicine and public health, University of Kansas school of medicine, Wichita
Stuart Dismuke Dean, Department of preventive medicine and public health, University of Kansas school of medicine, Wichita
Craig Molgaard Chair, Department of preventive medicine and public health, University of Kansas school of medicine, Wichita
Doren D Fredrickson Professor, Department of preventive medicine and public health, University of Kansas school of medicine, Wichita
Mark Berry Research assistant, Department of preventive medicine and public health, University of Kansas school of medicine, Wichita

RUTH WETTA-HALL and colleagues at the University of Kansas describe a study on how low income, uninsured patients in the US use emergency departments, and how this affects nursing practice

Primary care is defined as a regular source of care characterised by continuity, comprehensiveness, co-ordination, availability and convenience (Donaldson et al 1996, Stewart et al 1997). Lack of such a regular source of care is associated with increased reliance on emergency department (ED) services (Grossman et al 1998, Haugh 2002, Oster and Bindman 2003).

Emergency Nurse. 13, 3, 12-18. doi: 10.7748/en2005.06.13.3.12.c1046

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