Automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a case study
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Automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a case study

Jon Spiro Cardiology specialist registrar, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust
Maria Theodosiou Cardiology specialist registrar, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust
Sagar Doshi Consultant cardiologist, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust

Jon Spiro and colleagues describe the use of an electronic device to treat a patient who experienced cardiac arrest in an emergency department

Rates of survival after cardiac arrest are low and correlate with the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Devices that deliver automated CPR (A-CPR) can provide sustained and effective chest compressions, which are especially useful during patient transfer and while simultaneous invasive procedures are being performed. The use of such devices can also release members of resuscitation teams for other work. This article presents a case study involving a man with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock and pulmonary oedema. It describes how ED nursing and medical teams worked together to deliver A-CPR, discusses the use of A-CPR devices in a tertiary cardiac centre, and highlights the advantages of using such devices.

Emergency Nurse. 21, 9,28-30. doi: 10.7748/en2014.02.21.9.28.e1254

Correspondence

sagar.doshi@uhb.nhs.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to double blind peer review

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 07 November 2013

Accepted: 09 January 2014