Supporting self-management for people with laryngeal cancer through printed information
evidence and practice    

Supporting self-management for people with laryngeal cancer through printed information

Yoana Valentinova Docheva Third year nursing student, adult nursing, Department of Health Sciences, University of York, England

Why you should read this article
  • To acknowledge the need to support self-management for people living with and beyond cancer

  • To be aware of printed information resources as an aid to patient self-management in laryngeal cancer

  • To recognise that advice and support for patients with cancer need to be personalised and accessible

A growing number of people live longer with and beyond cancer, therefore cancer is increasingly considered a long-term condition, which has important implications in terms of self-management. Self-management patient education requires a shift from the traditional ‘hands-on’ style of patient education towards facilitating individual problem solving and collaborative goal setting and decision-making. A combination of generic and condition-specific self-management approaches is recommended. Patients with laryngeal cancer may lack the skills required to effectively self-manage their disease and printed information booklets can be used as an aid to self-management.

This article discusses the management of cancer as a long-term condition, the importance of educating patients with cancer to self-manage their condition, and the benefits and limitations of printed information resources as an aid to self-management in laryngeal cancer.

Cancer Nursing Practice. doi: 10.7748/cnp.2021.e1764

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

joana.docheva.93@gmail.com

Conflict of interest

None declared

Docheva YV (2021) Supporting self-management for people with laryngeal cancer through printed information. Cancer Nursing Practice. doi: 10.7748/cnp.2021.e1764

Acknowledgements

The author would like to thank Bethany Gibson, nursing student, and Mike Parker, associate professor and senior lecturer in emergency nursing at the University of York, for their critique of the article, as well as Ian Hamilton, senior lecturer in addiction and mental health at the University of York, for his guidance and advice

Published online: 17 May 2021

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