Does bilingual advocacy improve Bengali patients’ satisfaction with cancer services?
Clinical Previous     Next

Does bilingual advocacy improve Bengali patients’ satisfaction with cancer services?

Veronica Thomas Consultant health psychologist, Department of Haematology, Guy’s & St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust
Tariq Saleem Research fellow, Centre for Palliative Care in Neurology, Guy’s, King’s & St Thomas’ School of Medicine, Department of Palliative Care and Policy
Alison Richardson Professor of cancer and palliative nursing care, King’s College London

This research aimed to establish the efficacy of introducing bilingual health advocates to Bengali cancer patients who could not speak English. Two health advocates from the Bengali community received cancer-specific training and were allocated a group of cancer patients from the Bengali community in east London. Three methods were used to gauge the impact of the advocacy service: General Health Questionnaire-12; the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 (EORTC QLQ-C30); and a patient satisfaction questionnaire. Qualitative interviews were also conducted to gather patient and carers views. As a result of this study it is recommended that all hospital-based staff receive training on role and responsibilities of bilingual health advocates.

Cancer Nursing Practice. 5, 9,25-32. doi: 10.7748/cnp2006.11.5.9.25.c7587

You need a subscription to read the full article