Contribution of biobanks to care services
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Contribution of biobanks to care services

Claire Lewis Lecturer in nursing (education), School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen’s University Belfast
Adrina O’Donnell Clinical research nurse, Northern Ireland Cancer Trials Centre, Belfast City Hospital, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust
Stephen McQuaid Deputy scientific director, Northern Ireland Biobank, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen’s University Belfast
Jacqueline James Scientific director, Northern Ireland Biobank, Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen’s University Belfast

Claire Lewis and colleagues describe why the storage of high-quality human biospecimens is needed to enhance the prediction, diagnosis and treatment of cancer

Approaches to the management of patients with cancer have been revolutionised by the ability to examine tumours at a genetic and molecular level and tailor treatments accordingly. Underpinning this work is the need for large numbers of high-quality human biospecimens for use in translational research studies to identify new biomarkers for the prediction, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Biobanking has subsequently emerged as a dedicated activity to provide the infrastructure required for the standardised collection, storage and distribution of high quality human biospecimens for research purposes. This article provides an overview of the role of biobanks and the vital contribution they make to the delivery of cancer care for patients now and in the future.

Cancer Nursing Practice. 14, 9, 21-24. doi: 10.7748/cnp.14.9.21.s19

Correspondence

claire.lewis@qub.ac.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to double-blind review and checked using antiplagiarism software

Conflict of interest

Stephen McQuaid and Jacqueline James are employees of Northern Ireland Biobank

Received: 13 August 2015

Accepted: 05 October 2015