Improving women’s uptake of cervical screening in primary care
evidence and practice    

Improving women’s uptake of cervical screening in primary care

Valerie McMunn Visiting lecturer in women’s and sexual health, Division of Midwifery and Radiography, School of Health Sciences, City University of London, London, England

Why you should read this article:
  • To enhance your knowledge of how cervical screening is used to prevent cancer

  • To understand the reasons why some women do not attend cervical screening appointments

  • To count towards revalidation as part of your 35 hours of CPD, or you may wish to write a reflective account (UK readers)

  • To contribute towards your professional development and local registration renewal requirements (non-UK readers)

The number of women attending cervical screening appointments has been declining in recent years. As a result, cervical abnormalities are not being detected early and women are at increased risk of developing cervical cancer. This increased risk means that healthcare professionals in primary care need to devise strategies to improve the uptake of cervical screening.

This article outlines the data on non-attendance at cervical screening appointments and identifies the cohorts of women who are at the highest risk of non-attendance. The article also discusses strategies that healthcare professionals can implement to improve the uptake of cervical screening.

Primary Health Care. doi: 10.7748/phc.2019.e1588

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

vmcmunn@tiscali.co.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

McMunn V (2019) Improving women’s uptake of cervical screening in primary care. Primary Health Care. doi: 10.7748/phc.2019.e1588

Published online: 04 December 2019