Family satisfaction with patient care in critical care units in Pakistan: a descriptive cross-sectional study
Intended for healthcare professionals
Evidence & Practice    

Family satisfaction with patient care in critical care units in Pakistan: a descriptive cross-sectional study

Younas Ahtisham Junior lecturer, Shifa College of Nursing, Islamabad, Pakistan
Parveen Subia Assistant professor, Shifa College of Nursing, Islamabad, Pakistan
Victor Gideon Lecturer, Shifa College of Nursing, Islamabad, Pakistan

Aim: To assess family satisfaction with care provided to patients in critical care units in Islamabad.

Method: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 11 medical and surgical critical care units at two private hospitals in Islamabad, Pakistan. The purposive sample consisted of 323 immediate family members and other relatives and friends (referred to as family members in this article) of 323 patients admitted to the critical care units for at least 24 hours. The revised Critical Care Family Satisfaction Survey was used for data collection. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis.

Findings: A total of 149/323 (46%) family members were ‘very satisfied’ with the honesty (openness) of staff in explaining the patient’s condition, and 137/323 (42%) family members were ‘very satisfied’ with the nurses’ availability to speak to them. A total of 143/323 (44%) family members were ‘satisfied’ with the honesty (openness) of staff in explaining the patient’s condition, and 131/323 (41%) were ‘satisfied’ with the nurses’ availability to speak to them. A few family members (21/323, 6%) were ‘very dissatisfied’ with the flexibility of the visiting hours and a few (20/323, 6%) were ‘very dissatisfied’ with the noise level in the critical care units. Some family members (38/323, 12%) were ‘not satisfied’ with the flexibility of the visiting hours, and some (18/323, 6%) were ‘not satisfied’ with the noise level in the critical care units.

Conclusion: The majority of family members (244/323, 75%) were ‘satisfied’ or ‘very satisfied’ that their relatives’ needs were being met in the critical care units. However, qualitative data indicate that most family members wanted greater involvement in decision making. These findings should be considered by staff working in critical care settings to ensure high-quality patient care.

Nursing Standard. doi: 10.7748/ns.2016.e10587

Correspondence

ay6133@mun.ca

Received: 10 June 2016

Accepted: 22 August 2016

Published online: 28 October 2016

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