Supporting the carers of people with dementia
evidence and practice    

Supporting the carers of people with dementia

Gina Robinson Senior lecturer and academic senior nurse for continuing professional development and continuing workforce development, Faculty of Health Sciences and Wellbeing, University of Sunderland, Sunderland, England

Why you should read this article:
  • To enhance your knowledge of the physical and emotional effects that caring for a person with dementia can have on carers

  • To be aware of the importance of effective partnership working with carers of people with dementia

  • To understand the role of advance care planning and signposting to external services in supporting carers of people with dementia

Dementia is a progressive neurological syndrome. Because of its complexity and longevity, dementia can have a negative effect on the health of informal carers, including spouses, family members and friends. Carers of people with dementia are at increased risk of depression and some long-term conditions; however, there are interventions that nurses can implement to support them. This article reviews the effect that caring has on carers of people with dementia, while exploring how nurses can provide optimal support through care planning, signposting to external services and understanding the importance of the role of carers.

Nursing Standard. doi: 10.7748/ns.2019.e11239

Citation

Robinson G (2019) Supporting the carers of people with dementia. Nursing Standard. doi: 10.7748/ns.2019.e11239

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

gina.m.robinson@sunderland.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Published online: 17 December 2018

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