Nutritional interventions for preventing malnutrition in people with dementia
evidence and practice    

Nutritional interventions for preventing malnutrition in people with dementia

Stacey Jones Course director/senior lecturer, dietetics, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Coventry University, England

Dementia is a progressive, chronic condition affecting cognitive functioning and is most prevalent in people aged over 65. Weight loss, malnutrition and dehydration are common in people living with dementia and can occur at any stage of the condition. Malnutrition can have devastating consequences on quality of life and clinical outcomes and significantly increases the risk of morbidity and mortality. Dementia affects a person’s ability and desire to eat and drink to meet their nutritional requirements. This article identifies problems associated with nutritional status in people living with dementia and outlines the effectiveness of interventions to counteract the negative effects on nutritional status.

Nursing Older People. doi: 10.7748/nop.2019.e1144

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

ab7731@coventry.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Jones S (2019) Nutritional interventions for preventing malnutrition in people with dementia. Nursing Older People. doi: 10.7748/nop.2019.e1144

Published online: 10 July 2019