Development and evaluation of an electronic medical device training passport to identify nurses’ training needs
Intended for healthcare professionals
Evidence and practice    

Development and evaluation of an electronic medical device training passport to identify nurses’ training needs

Kellie-Jayne Mohess Critical care health informatics nurse lead, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, London, England
Jonathan Turner Lecturer, Centre for Health Informatics, City, University of London, London, England

Why you should read this article:
  • To recognise some of the factors that can make it challenging for nurses to access training and maintain competence in using medical devices

  • To learn about development of an electronic medical device training passport that aims to better identify nurses’ training needs

  • To understand the benefits of an electronic medical device training passport for nurses, nurse managers and clinical leaders

Background All nurses, particularly those working in critical care settings, are required to use medical devices when providing patient care. However, inconsistent practice and variations in documentation can make it challenging for nurses and nurse managers to identify what medical device training is required and when.

Aim To develop and evaluate the use of an electronic medical device training passport to identify the training needs of nurses in intensive care units (ICUs).

Method A pilot study was conducted in a multi-unit critical care department in London, England, to determine if the passport could make it easier to identify ICU nurses’ medical device training needs compared with existing practice. Nine participants were first asked to identify their needs using existing spreadsheets or paper records, then asked to identify them using the passport. The participants were also interviewed to identify their training requirements before and after using the passport. The data were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively.

Findings The electronic passport significantly improved identification of medical device training needs compared with paperwork or spreadsheets for all device groups, except for medical devices used on high dependency units (P≤0.005). However, there may be issues related to nurses’ behaviours and expectations, particularly that staff do not always recognise their need for training.

Conclusion The findings of this pilot study suggest that the use of an electronic medical device training passport has many benefits and could make it easier to identify ICU nurses’ training needs in clinical practice.

Nursing Management. doi: 10.7748/nm.2021.e2024

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

Kellie-Jayne.Mohess@gstt.nhs.uk

Conflict of interest

None declared

Mohess KJ, Turner J (2021) Development and evaluation of an electronic medical device training passport to identify nurses’ training needs. Nursing Management. doi: 10.7748/nm.2021.e2024

The authors wish to thank Neil Gallacher, head of informatics and audit (critical care), Karen Franklin, critical care health informatics nurse lead, and nurses in Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust critical care department

Published online: 20 December 2021

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