Parents’ experiences of hope following a child’s brain injury
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Parents’ experiences of hope following a child’s brain injury

Liz Bray Lead nurse, placements and commissioning, Children’s Trust, Tadworth, Surrey

Professionals need to understand the difficulties families face following a childhood-acquired brain injury and help them maintain a sense of optimism, says Liz Bray

Aim To explore the lived experiences of parents caring for their child following a severe to moderate acquired brain injury (ABI).

Methods A Heideggerian phenomenological approach was used and the research set within the naturalistic paradigm. Eight parents were identified using purposive sampling. Each parent was interviewed on a one-to-one basis using semi-structured interviews. The interviews were typed up verbatim and the data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings Every parent acknowledged the need to maintain hope. The other themes identified were: the effects on the child post ABI, the need for accurate information, emotional support, effects on the family, fear of death, transition, family accommodation and funding.

Conclusion Following a childhood brain injury it is important that parents can maintain a sense of hope and receive emotional support and accurate information. Staff could use these research findings to increase their awareness and inform their own practice.

Correspondence lbray@thechildrenstrust.org.uk

Nursing Children and Young People. 27, 7,22-26. doi: 10.7748/ncyp.27.7.22.e618

Received: 09 February 2015

Accepted: 26 May 2015

Published in print: 11 September 2015

Peer review

This article has been subject to open review and has been checked using antiplagiarism software

Conflict Of Interest

None declared