OC47 – NICUs and family-centred care, from the leadership to the design, the results of a survey in Italy (by FCC Italian NICU study group)
Supplement Previous     Next

Open Access OC47 – NICUs and family-centred care, from the leadership to the design, the results of a survey in Italy (by FCC Italian NICU study group)

Immacolata Dall’Oglio , University of Rome ‘Tor Vergata’, Professional Development, Continuing Education and Nursing Research Service, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Italy
Anna Portanova , Department of Medical and Surgical Neonatology, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Italy
Emanuela Tiozzo , Professional Development, Continuing Education and Nursing Research Service, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Italy
Orsola Gawronsk , University of Rome ‘Tor Vergata’, Professional Development, Continuing Education and Nursing Research Service, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Italy
Gennaro Rocco , Centre of Excellence for Nursing Scholarship, Ipasvi Rome Nursing College, Italy
JM Latour , Clinical Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health and Human Sciences Plymouth University, United Kingdom

Theme: Leadership, management, nursing education.

Introduction: Family-centered care (FCC) in NICUs is related to staff culture and the organization of the unit.

Aim: To describe the organizational characteristics and services for families in Italian NICUs.

Methods: This survey involved 105 NICUs in Italy. The Italian version of the ‘FCC in the NICUs: A Self-Assessment Inventory’ developed by the Institute for FCC was sent to the nurse managers in January 2015.

Results: Forty-seven NICUs answered (49%). The means of the NICU characteristics are number of beds: 20; newborns discharged/year: 331, of which very low birth weight infant: 68; unit’s rooms: 3.7). The total mean score of the 10 areas explored by questionnaire was 2.6 (on 5 points Likert scale) for the ‘status’ and of 2.3 (on 3 points scale) for priority for change.

Conclusion: The results show an organizational lack, but also the consciousness of the need of change. Sharing new organizational strategies could be an important issue for the future.

Nursing Children and Young People. 28, 4, 86-86. doi: 10.7748/ncyp.28.4.86.s78

Published in print on 09 May 2016