The long-term effects of childhood wartime trauma on anxiety in later life
Evidence & Practice Previous     Next

The long-term effects of childhood wartime trauma on anxiety in later life

Karen Julie Longson Teaching fellow, Keele University Faculty of Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Royal Stoke University Hospital, England
Roger Beech Reader in research development, Keele University Faculty of Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Royal Stoke University Hospital, England

At any point in time up to 10% of people over the age of 65 experience symptoms of anxiety. Yet the effects of anxiety in the older population are under-researched. Paternal separation in childhood has been cited as a factor for psychological well-being later in life, potentially with greater significance for males. A period of notable paternal separation was during the second world war, when 1.5 million British children were evacuated from cities. A number of authors have explored the effect of childhood trauma on mental health and found that such events are implicated in the development of anxiety and depression. This article will explore the research carried out and how this knowledge may support the work of clinicians in older age mental health services to understand the life experiences of the people they care for.

Mental Health Practice. 21, 4,30-35. doi: 10.7748/mhp.2017.e1215

Correspondence

k.j.longson@keele.ac.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Conflict of interest

None declared

Write for us

For information about writing for RCNi journals, contact writeforus@rcni.com

For author guidelines, go to rcni.com/writeforus

Received: 23 September 2016

Accepted: 28 June 2017