Martial arts, disruptive innovation and the future of physical interventions in learning disability settings
Evidence & Practice    

Martial arts, disruptive innovation and the future of physical interventions in learning disability settings

Lee Hollins Self-employed risk assessor, North Weald, Essex, England

Physical intervention techniques must continue to be refined and developed to ensure they are safe, and fit for purpose. However, it could be argued that innovation in this area has plateaued, partly because training providers build their business around fixed techniques, which leads to stasis. Further, the drive to eliminate restrictive practices has placed a focus on prevention of physical restraint and physical intervention, rather than evolution of the techniques. This article considers martial arts, the origin of most physical restraint techniques, and examines how they have been modernised, using Christensen's failure framework, to instigate critical debate around how physical intervention techniques need to improve.

Learning Disability Practice. doi: 10.7748/ldp.2018.e1811

Correspondence

leehollins@winchesterscott.co.uk

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Conflict of interest

None declared

Received: 17 October 2016

Accepted: 04 September 2017

Published online: 19 January 2018