Evaluating an evidence-based online screening tool to identify learning disability
evidence and practice    

Evaluating an evidence-based online screening tool to identify learning disability

Karen McKenzie Professor of Psychology, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England
Aja Murray Lecturer in Psychology, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland
Judith Thompson Network Chair, North East and Cumbria Learning Disability Network, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England
Karen Horridge Consultant Paediatrician (disability), South Tyneside and Sunderland NHS Foundation Trust, South Shields, England
Kristofor McCarty Senior Lecturer, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England

Why you should read this article:
  • To learn how people with a learning disability continue to experience significant health inequalities

  • To understand how many people’s learning disability goes unrecognised

  • To familiarise yourself with the Child and Adolescent Intellectual Disability Questionnaire

Background Many people with a learning disability are unable to benefit from health improvement measures because their learning disability is unrecognised. Screening tools such as the Child and Adolescent Intellectual Disability Screening Questionnaire (CAIDS-Q) can assist with the identification of learning disability.

Aim To explore whether the use of a new online version of the CAIDS-Q to identify whether or not an individual was likely to have a learning disability was consistent with reported learning disability as identified previously by a healthcare or education professional.

Methods Anonymous data from people who used the online CAIDS-Q in the first weeks of the launch were collated and analysed.

Results Of the 159 people who used the online CAIDS-Q, 126 (79%) were family members and/or carers of the person being screened and 31 (19%) were professionals (predominantly healthcare and education professionals). Of the 52 people who had been identified previously as having a learning disability, 47 (90%) were correctly identified as such by the CAIDS-Q score.

Conclusion The CAIDS-Q online screening tool for learning disability can be used by professionals and parents. It correctly identified 90% of people who had previously been identified as having a learning disability. The accuracy of the online version of the CAIDS-Q is similar to hard copy versions, which suggests that it may be an accurate tool that can assist with the identification of people with a learning disability.

Learning Disability Practice. doi: 10.7748/ldp.2020.e2106

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and has been checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

k.mckenzie@northumbria.ac.uk

Conflict of interest

Karen McKenzie is a co-developer of the Child and Adolescent Intellectual Disability Screening Questionnaire (CAIDS-Q) and receives a small payment for its use

McKenzie K, Murray A, Thompson J et al (2020) Evaluating an evidence-based online screening tool to identify learning disability. Learning Disability Practice. doi: 10.7748/ldp.2020.e2106

Published online: 19 November 2020

Want to read more?

Subscribe for unlimited access

Try 1 month’s access for just £1 and get:

Your subscription package includes:
  • Full access to the website and the online archive
  • Bi-monthly digital edition
  • RCNi Portfolio and interactive CPD quizzes
  • RCNi Learning with 200+ evidence-based modules
  • 10 articles a month from any other RCNi journal
Subscribe
RCN student member? Try Nursing Standard Student
Already subscribed? Log in

Alternatively, you can purchase access to this article for the next seven days. Buy now

Or