Workplace violence: the experiences of emergency nurses in Indonesia
Evidence and practice    

Workplace violence: the experiences of emergency nurses in Indonesia

Anja Hesnia Kholis Faculty member, Department of Medical-Surgical and Emergency Nursing, Sekolah Tinggi Ilmu Kesehatan Pemkab Jombang, Jombang, Indonesia
Nurul Hidayah Faculty member, Department of Medical-Surgical and Emergency Nursing, Sekolah Tinggi Ilmu Kesehatan Pemkab Jombang, Jombang, Indonesia
Ratna Puji Priyanti Faculty member, Department of Medical-Surgical and Emergency Nursing, Sekolah Tinggi Ilmu Kesehatan Pemkab Jombang, Jombang, Indonesia
Asri Faculty member, Department of Community Health Nursing, Universitas Muhammadiyah Surabaya, Surabaya, Indonesia.

Why you should read this article
  • To recognise the severity of workplace violence towards emergency department (ED) nurses

  • To be aware of the findings of exploratory research that examined experiences of ED nurses in Indonesia of workplace violence

  • To identify strategies to reduce and prevent workplace violence in the ED

Background Workplace violence in hospitals is common and underreported. It has adverse effects professionally and personally for victims, and can have a negative effect on the quality of patient care.

Aim To explore Indonesian emergency department (ED) nurses’ experiences of workplace violence.

Method This exploratory qualitative study used five sessions of focus group discussion. The participants were recruited from a referral hospital in a regional area of East Java province, Indonesia, using purposive sampling. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data.

Findings A total of 13 ED nurses participated. Four themes and three sub-themes were identified: (1) Disrupting the rule; (2) Feeling unsafe; (3) Governing the case with the sub-themes mitigating violence, improving reporting flow and receiving follow-up; and (4) Keeping for myself.

Conclusion Managing workplace violence is crucial for the provision of high-quality nursing care in the ED. Hospital management’s commitment to zero tolerance of violence is an important statement of support for nurses. Zero tolerance could be shown by improving safety in the ED, simplifying reporting systems and educating and training staff in responding to incidents, and de-escalation techniques.

Emergency Nurse. doi: 10.7748/en.2021.e2058

Peer review

This article has been subject to external double-blind peer review and checked for plagiarism using automated software

Correspondence

ns.ratnapuji@gmail.com

Conflict of interest

None declared

Kholis AH, Hidayah N, Priyanti RP et al (2021) Workplace violence: the experiences of emergency nurses in Indonesia. Emergency Nurse. doi: 10.7748/en.2021.e2058

Acknowledgements

Directorate General of Research and Development, Director of Research and Community Service, Ministry of Research, Technology and Higher Education of the Republic of Indonesia for the funding (Penelitian Dosen Pemula research fund). Professor Min-Tao Hsu, School of Nursing, Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan, for guidance on completing the manuscript

Published online: 18 May 2021

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